Topics that MUST be included in final stage designer guide

The final word on what flys and what doesn't in competition. What do you think we need to do to make each and every match fair and safe for all shooters.
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todd
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Topics that MUST be included in final stage designer guide

Post by todd » Tue Nov 21, 2006 11:32 am

A list of ideas and concepts which can help stage designers keep things in perspective and create the most level playing field for all competitors.

I think the main idea which is echoed by many disciplines is to create stage designs which test the competitors skill as a shooter not physical ability such as running around from position to position. Although there will almost always be movement in stages we might want to establish some design guideline for maximum distance between strings.


more to come... give me your thoughts.

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Post by Paul Winters » Tue Nov 21, 2006 2:59 pm

The concept of level playing field implies many things. Distance and movement depend on course terrain and surface. Weather also plays another facet, especially wet and cold weather. I view level playing field as consistancy of course, target presentation, and even handed ruling from those in charge. I think distance is, in a great deal of events, determined by the range or bay itself. I am not sure how one could determine a course of fire or string to string distance maximum, especially if movement is not in a straight line. Experience is the best educator of stage design distance. In USPSA state matches, the big boys didn't really have distance as an obstical. As a good friend of mine once stated, "I may be slow, but I make up for it as a stable shooting platform". Once you start on distance, then you need to address kneeling, prone, etc. I agree that extreme distance running is not a good thing and this should be pointed out in outline form. A bigger issue is ground condition and weather. This has always been an issue in a match where it is sunny in the AM and raining in the PM. Carpet has been the slvation at the Creek. Also there is the issue of temperature. Slow moving targets when cold on the morning and speeding up in the afternoon when warmer. The best we can shoot for a guideline for stage design and emphasis on key elements, in my thinking, warped as it might be. OK, who's next?

Paul : -)#

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Post by todd » Tue Nov 21, 2006 5:22 pm

I have shot some stages in the past where shooting boxes were say 30-40 ft apart and those who could sprint from point A to point B had a significant advantage over those who were umm... acceleration challenged :D

I can run no problemo... however some other folks we shoot with are a bit slower in their get up and go :lol: having shoot boxes so far apart and with several of them on a stage time really adds up for the slower folks. With all skills being the same the winner would be decided on who can run faster.

Just a thought... I'd think we would want to suggest avoiding that type of scenario if at all possible.

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